Researchers found that 4G vulnerabilities can steal user information and send false alarms

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According to foreign media reports, researchers at Purdue University and the University of Iowa after research and investigation found a large number of new vulnerabilities in the 4G LTE network, they can peeping user information, tapping their phones, making the device offline or even false Emergency alert. The researchers described 10 attacks in detail in their response report. These vulnerabilities can initiate authentication relay attacks by emulating the identities of existing users. While verifying that relay attacks are not new attacks, recent research shows that they can be used to intercept messages, track users’ locations, and prevent them from connecting to the network. During the study, researchers used a test framework called LTEInspector that helps detect loopholes in LTE radios and networks. Syed Rafiul Hussain, a member of the research team, said that among the 10 attacks they discovered, they have identified 8 of them with SIMs from four major carriers in the United States. “Most of these attacks are rooted in the lack of proper authentication, encryption, and playback of critical protocol information.” Hussain said the vulnerabilities could be used to ficture the victim’s device’s location. This will give some criminals a hindrance to the progress of investigations by law enforcement officials through the placement of fake location information. Another is to send “false alarms” to devices in specific areas, triggering “human confusion.” The warning of a ballistic missile in Hawaii in January this year caused quite a stir in the area, except that it was not triggered by a cyberattack, but both had the same impact. Hussain said they found that a carrier in the United States has never been able to encrypt aircraft information and is most likely to be used by cybercriminals to steal cell phone messages and other sensitive data. However, Hussain did not disclose the company’s name, but said the other has been fixed. The researchers also said that anyone can use the common software radio and open source 4G LTE protocol software to launch these attacks, the cost can be as low as 1300 US dollars to 3900 US dollars. However, they will not be released with any proof-of-concept code until the vulnerabilities have been fixed. While every merchant promises that the upcoming 5G network will become faster and safer, it is clear that 4G LTE will not disappear in the near future, so these loopholes should not be underestimated.

Is Musk’s space Internet successful?

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SpaceX, a unit of Elon Musk, sent two test internet satellites into space. This means that Musk has joined a space race that has left many people dreamy of death. Each company has burned billions of dollars in its dream of providing Internet services to the world through low-orbit satellite systems. Globalstar, a satellite carrier, and Iridium Communications, an Iridium satellite, are on the brink of bankruptcy. The dream is also underpinned by Microsoft founders Bill Gates, Boeing and other investors. But the bleak reality did not block the progress of nearly two dozen companies. They are scrambling to raise funds to reach out to more Internet broadband users, including many who are beyond the reach of traditional mobile services. Icon: Falcon heavy rocket “There is not much more than hysteria and unrealistic expectations,” Roger Rusch, president of Palos Verdes, a California-based market consultancy, said in an interview. SpaceX, one of Muskela’s space exploration technology companies, OneWeb of Greg Wyler, Boeing, and Telesat of Canada are demanding that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allow its use of satellites to provide Internet broadband services. But Lusch said the technical challenges are daunting. Low-orbit satellite systems not only require complex software to operate satellites, but also require complex ground antenna systems to keep pace with satellites in the sky. Lush noted that operating expenditures will soon exceed the savings made using small satellite equipment. Boeing is applying to the FCC for licenses for 60 satellites, and last year the FCC had licensed OneWeb to use the 720 satellite service licensed by the United Kingdom to the U.S. market. SpaceX’s plan would require 4,425 satellites to be in orbit, and it will submit an application to the FCC for an additional 7,518 satellites. Ajit Pai, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, expressed his support for the application, which makes it possible for SpaceX to license Internet broadband services through low-orbit satellite systems. According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, a coalition of U.S. scientists for anxiety, as of August last year, there were 1,738 orbiting satellites in orbit worldwide. The number of satellites in the SpaceX program will far exceed the number of satellites currently in operation in all countries. SpaceX spokesman John Taylor said in an emailed statement that the two satellites launched last week are all test equipment. “Even though these satellites are on track as planned, we still have a lot of technical work to do in designing and deploying low-orbit satellite systems,” said Taylor, which will provide affordable high-speed Internet access in less populated remote areas Into service. LEO satellites range from 50 to 1,200 miles (80 to 2,000 kilometers) above the Earth and run around Earth orbit every 90 minutes. Traditional communications satellites, about 22,000 miles (36,000 kilometers) above the ground, require one day to travel around the Earth’s orbit and stay relatively still with the Earth itself. Low-orbit satellites offer additional advantages in sending and receiving wideband signals with less signal latency and no interruption in phone calls and streaming video. At present Universal Broadband service has become a more compelling target, said Satellite Industry Association President Tom Stroup, with a growing demand for satellite services. Strlub said the new generation of satellites has become more compact and lightweight. “We’ve gone completely beyond the realm of experimentation,” […]