Where do the magnetic fields that shape the universe come from?

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The power that shapes our universe is not solely gravity. The magnetic field that has long been forgotten may have played an important role in it. Image Source: “New Scientist” (Compilation / Shea) Whenever it comes to the universe, gravity does its part. It allows our feet to stand firmly on the ground, and it shapes our universe. It causes the cloud of gas to collapse, forming stars and planets. It gave birth to hundreds of billions of stars in galaxies. It is also under its influence that galaxies converge into galaxy clusters and further form super-galaxy clusters. However, in this game, gravity is not the only player – there is a force between the universe, it is magnetic.

NASA to launch new telescope next month or find “new Earth” outside the solar system

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In a clean room at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, a small telescope is being placed on a plateau for the final series of tests before launch. The reason why the test is extremely strict is that the four cameras of this telescope will have no protective cover when fired. This is one of the simplified design decisions NASA has made to help TSP achieve its goal of detecting at least 50 potential small-sized rocky planets. In fact, the TESS proposal is even older than NASA’s Kepler telescope project. Kepler, launched in 2009, confirms the space survivability of the extraterrestrial planetary probe. Both telescopes have adopted the “Lingri method” to find extraterrestrial planets. The Kepler telescope not only confirms that Lingri Fa is a powerful planetary search technology but also finds that our galaxy is populated with an alarming number of planets, many of which are two to four times larger than our own. In the initial mission phase, the Kepler telescope searched for stars a thousand light-years away in the starry sky of Cygnus, Lyra and Draco. So far, scientists have determined that out of the roughly 170,000 stars Kepler has explored, 2,341 aliens orbiting these stars revolve around them. Another 4496 candidate planets have not yet been identified, but many of the planets may never be validated because their host stars are too dim to make ground-based telescopes more difficult to observe in subsequent studies. TESS project team used a reverse observation method, first using the ground observation station to determine the candidate class of planets, and then astronomical telescopes to determine the observation target. They selected about 200,000 stars for the first two years of TESS’s mission. The European Space Agency’s Gaia telescope details each of the target stars, and the Gaia telescope is creating a catalog of the universe’s most complete planetary positions and distances ever recorded. Most of TESS’s targets are within 300 light-years of Earth’s distance and closer to most of the stars explored by the Kepler telescope, and their brightness is even brighter. Stephen Rinehart, a project scientist from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said: “In the TESS project, we will be able to conduct follow-up ground tracking studies of all our targets and that’s a matter of sequence and there is no issue of ability.” Ling-day detection technology to detect the relative size of the planet and host stars. If multiple canvassing phenomena can be observed, scientists can also determine the position of the star’s orbit from the star. This information can then be used to assess its temperature and the likelihood of liquid water on its surface, which is the planet Is a key factor in livable. But assessing the mass of a planet requires determining whether it is made of metals and rocks similar to the Earth or ice and gas, when astronomers probe with a geospatial telescope. This usually requires a medium-sized observatory to observe the star’s light swing caused by gravitational attraction. The TESS project is recruiting dozens of astronomers to participate in the project, and plans to use the free time of several ground-based telescopes for follow-up research. TESS is currently scheduled to launch in mid-April this year, about two months after its launch, it will begin to search nearby nearby planets. At that time, the astronomical telescope […]